The Grandest of Openings

The Grandest of Openings

You know what we love? I mean other than the obvious answer of wood windows, of course. We love people. So you can only imagine how elated we were about hosting an event entirely devoted to welcoming others into our shop. Last Thursday we held our official Grand Opening for the Great Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce right here in our facility, complete with the Junction Coffee Bus and an amazing spread of tasty eats catered by one of our talented clients, Bo Taylor.

WWR in KCMO

WWR in KCMO

Kansas City may be famous for its barbeque, but we found ourselves drooling over more than their brisket and ribs. But wait! We are from Oklahoma City. What are we doing talking about Kansas City’s saucy smoked goods? Well, friends, let me tell you all about our experience as a vendor at the Main Street Now Conference, about the relationships we are building, and dare I say, the vision we have for the Midwest.

Window Glazing Made Easy

How to glaze a wood window with Aqua Glaze.

Here at the Wood Window Rescue Shop, we have searched the internet to find the best and most accessible old window repair techniques to share with our audience. This video series from Dave Bowers of Olde Window Restorer is one of the best. We use these videos for training in our window restoration projects and love how the historic wood windows turn out. We hope that you will find these videos and additional window sash repair insight to be helpful.

Tools Needed:

  • Putty Knife
  • Damp Rag

Material Needed:

  • Glazing Points
  • Aqua Glaze

Getting Started

We suggest that you remove the window sash from the wood window frame. We also recommend using a make-shift sash easel on a slight incline. If you are doing this at homes and want the best results, do it outside and make sure you have enough time set aside to complete an entire window sash glazing.

Tips on Working with Aqua Glaze

  • Work up a softball sized amount of Aqua Glaze and then set aside in a separate container.
  • To keep window glazing from drying out, keep only a small amount of window putty in your hand while you work the glazing into the wood window sash.

Putty Knife Tricks

  • Keep your knife clean and free of grim. Grim will cause the glazing to drag and will leave a rough, less than desirable window sash glazing.
  • Make sure to use a flexible putty knife. Apply enough pressure so that the knife bends as you pull the knife over the window glazing. Doing this presses the glazing on to the glass and wood on the wood window.
  • Keep your knife moist by wiping often with a damp rag.

How to Estimate Glazing Material

To estimate glazing, we use a great tool created by the folks at SRS Hardware. Here are the basics:

Number of Sashes x Number of Lights Per Sash x .2 x .2 x Perimeter of Each Light x .0022=Gallons of Glazing needed.

To get a more precise estimate and for further detail please check out the Putty Calculator.

Final Tip...

Don't give up! It may take a few tries...especially on those corners. The important part is you are doing this instead of replacing with disposable vinyl windows. 

If you need help, just comment below and we will do our best to help.

5 Renovation Guarantees...That Will Suck

I do my best to make every project as predictable as possible and yet, in every job and every customer complaint, the same things come up. So to be completely transparent, here are the five things that will suck about your renovation project.

1. The Mess

There is no way around this one. There will be a mess! Saw dust, drywall dust, normal dust...we do everything we can to keep it clean but inevitably, we will not get it all. In addition, subcontractors will eat lunch at the job or have a big gulp. I would like to say we are perfect and this always ends up in the trash, but that is not always the case.

However, we do strive to keep job sites clean. We keep trash receptacles on site so it is obvious where the Coke can goes. Each sub-contractor cleans up after they are finished so the next contractor has a clean work area. Outside areas are cleaned up daily, so that loose material is not blowing all over neighborhood. 

2. The Unexpected

I wish I had an x-ray machine and could see through walls. However, I do not. I have opened up walls and found that 60% of the framing was chewed up by termites. I have finished beautiful projects only to find that some backwoods plumber, without a clue or a permit, improperly tied into the sewer main. If you expect anything expect finding this, haphazard wiring, backwards plumbing, irregular framing, asbestos or mold.

It will suck. You will be angry. It will add to your cost. But I will patiently walk through it with you.

remodel_plans_costs.jpg

3. The Cost

First, the cost of a renovation can be expensive and there is often major sticker shock. If you are considering DIY, I would do some soul searching first. Someone else's DIY could could be the reason you have unexpected costs.

Remember, you get that for which you pay. If you hire a handyman, chances are your base cost will be low but your cost overruns will be high. I once took over a project that the owner had paid the handyman and affordable $18/per hour and there was no material mark-up. Sounds like a great deal! Until you realize that he had been on the job for five years! That is a total labor cost of $187,000!!! Then, you add in the materials...YIKES!! 

I always try to fall in the "Goldilocks Zone"...Not too low. Not too high. 

4. The Delays

I have tried praying, cussing and wishing...but there are still delays. 

First, there is the weather. If any exterior work is part of the project, you should just expect delays. Second, life happens. People get sick, have babies, vehicles break down. These things just happen. Third, things change. The copper farmhouse sink is six weeks out instead of two. Fourth and final, it's not a delay...it's down time. There are unavoidable down time periods. Waiting for city inspections, utility companies, scheduling of subcontractors and delivery of materials. 

When we start a project, we have a detailed plan and schedule. It generally includes a level of expectation for delays and down time. And most projects are completed within 2 weeks of original scheduled completion.

5. The Punch-out

The house is almost done. You're ready to move in. That day is so close you can taste it! Press the pause button...there are still a few loose ends. Inevitably, there will be a few things that need to be done. Things like paint touch-up, final cleaning and minor hardware adjustments are very common. These things should not delay the project (See 4). The mistake most people make is that they move in too quick and a weeks worth of punch out items becomes a month of working around furniture, pets and people.

I always recommend doing a walk through with a project manager using a camera, note pad and blue masking tape. Identify what finished looks like and allow the project manager reasonable time to complete.

These are not avoidable, but reasonable expectations. Clear communication between the home owner and the project manager can make them manageable and able to overcome.

Old Rubble of Past Lives

    We all have something at our core that makes us who we are. Often times, it has to do with who we believe created us, who we believe we are and what we feel we are created to do.   I know many people that have a faith-based business. Some produce faith-based products...a verse on the back or a cross on the front. Here in the Bible Belt, it is very common to have a faith-based dentist, grocery store, roofer, etc. This is usually expressed in Christian music playing in the office or store, a Ichthys on marketing material or a commitment to give a percentage of profit to a church. And though my faith is central to my life and I have a deep desire to express it in the everyday, these types of well meaning expressions are not for me.   Some of you will rebuild the deserted ruins of your cities.    Then you will be known as a rebuilder of walls    and a restorer of homes.    Isaiah 58:12(NLT)      The reason I am draw to renovation, restoration and preservation of old homes is theological. It is central to what I believe about who God is and what He has done for us. I believe homes follow the same path that humans do. They are created individual and unique with a special purpose. But, at some point, they are forgotten and become broken. The good news is that this doesn't have to be the end of the story. I want my work on homes to be a reflection of the work that Jesus is doing in the human race. Restoring and Renewing.  Just as in Jesus, we are restored and renewed. I believe that homes need to be restored and given new life. When I think about the wreck some of the houses we have repaired were in, when I recall how bad the damage was, how forgotten the home was and how hopeless the project felt at the beginning and how in the end it was a beautifully restored home...I see the Gospel. If a bunch of broken people can restore a broken house...what can a perfect God do with a bunch of broken people?

 

We all have something at our core that makes us who we are. Often times, it has to do with who we believe created us, who we believe we are and what we feel we are created to do. 

I know many people that have a faith-based business. Some produce faith-based products...a verse on the back or a cross on the front. Here in the Bible Belt, it is very common to have a faith-based dentist, grocery store, roofer, etc. This is usually expressed in Christian music playing in the office or store, a Ichthys on marketing material or a commitment to give a percentage of profit to a church. And though my faith is central to my life and I have a deep desire to express it in the everyday, these types of well meaning expressions are not for me.

Some of you will rebuild the deserted ruins of your cities.

Then you will be known as a rebuilder of walls

and a restorer of homes.

Isaiah 58:12(NLT)

 

The reason I am draw to renovation, restoration and preservation of old homes is theological. It is central to what I believe about who God is and what He has done for us. I believe homes follow the same path that humans do. They are created individual and unique with a special purpose. But, at some point, they are forgotten and become broken. The good news is that this doesn't have to be the end of the story. I want my work on homes to be a reflection of the work that Jesus is doing in the human race. Restoring and Renewing.

Just as in Jesus, we are restored and renewed. I believe that homes need to be restored and given new life. When I think about the wreck some of the houses we have repaired were in, when I recall how bad the damage was, how forgotten the home was and how hopeless the project felt at the beginning and how in the end it was a beautifully restored home...I see the Gospel. If a bunch of broken people can restore a broken house...what can a perfect God do with a bunch of broken people?